Support for Folk Art in America?

Recently read in the Etsy forums:

“Please. Someone, everyone, do something to save the American Folk Art Museum from dissolution and dispersal,” begged art critic Roberta Smith in the opening line of her plea in The New York Times last week.

I was unaware that the American Folk Art Museum was in trouble . . . it is the most awesome place I have ever visited! How can we let it fall and disappear?  Apparently, it has been rescued . . . but for how long? We need to do something to preserve and protect our folk art heritage!

The article goes on:

Having narrowly escaped financial ruin by selling off one of its two locations, the future of New York City’s American Folk Art Museum (AFAM), whose staff of 50 has dwindled to 10, has been bleak. Fortunately, within a few days of Smith’s article, donors came through and saved the museum at the last minute. AFAM is still in critical condition — the road to recovery will involve internal restructuring and, presumably, a massive media campaign to attract visitors. The case of AFAM is just more evidence proving how over time, the words “folk” and “craft” have developed a negative connotation, often marginalized and excluded from high art.
 

Please read the rest of the article at Etsy.com here:

http://www.etsy.com/blog/en/2011/noted-the-future-of-folk-art/?ref=fp_blog_image

(note the gorgeous photo of all those red and white quilts hung for a show!)

Who would have ever thought that folk art would make it to the endangered species  list? Unspeakable! What can we do to make sure we don’t lose all this wonderful, historic art?

Sally

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2 thoughts on “Support for Folk Art in America?

  1. I am a beginner and have made a few small projects. I just started a larger rug and purchased a used puritan frame. I am having a difficult time with the gripping strips. It is not holding my rug tight and now my pattern seems distorted. Do gripping stips wear out? If so, do you have any for sale or advise where to purchase them? Thank you for your help.

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  2. I wonder which location was sold? When I visited the museum several years back I was shocked by how small it was. I was the only visitor for several hours. Got all the time I needed with the staff. They had no one else to talk to.

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